Rose Café au Lait Recipe

The café au lait is the perfect drink when you're craving coffee flavor, but in a creamier package than a latte. The best part is that this café au lait recipe is incredibly simple. It's equal parts coffee and milk, and we’ve added 2 tablespoons of our rose simple syrup. It’s a creamy and sweet coffee for a cozy morning.

If you were to visit the coffee stands in New Orleans, you’ll see café au lait made with coffee and chicory. Some coffee companies produce it under the name “New Orleans Blend”. The popular brands in New Orleans are Community and CDM (which is the Café du Monde store brand sold in Louisiana). I’ve been able to find coffee and chicory at specialty food stores, World Market, and oddly enough, the international aisle of my local chain grocery in Minneapolis. And of course, there’s always online.

If you aren’t able to find coffee and chicory, (or if you simply don’t care for it), you can use a dark roast coffee. Or your favorite coffee- make what you like!


ROSE CAFÉ AU LAIT INGREDIENTS:

  • Your Favorite Milk
  • Your Favorite Coffee
  • Social Mixers Rose Simple Syrup

HOW TO MAKE A ROSE CAFÉ AU LAIT:

  • Place 2 tablespoons of Social Mixers Rose Simple Syrup into coffee mug
  • Prepare 4 oz. of coffee
  • Heat 4 oz. of milk on the stovetop or with a steamer.
  • Once milk is heated, combine coffee and milk into the mug
  • Stir
  • Sip and savor

TIPS & TRICKS FOR A DELICIOUS ROSE CAFÉ AU LAIT:

Whole milk is going to result in a creamier café au lait due to the fat content, but you can use any milk that you would like. I’ve found that hemp milk or oat milk make great dairy substitutes.


FAQ:

What does café au lait mean?

Café au lait is french for “coffee with milk.”

What is Coffee and Chicory and why do people drink it?

Chicory is the root of the endive plant and when dried is somewhat reminiscent of coffee. During the civil war, there was a coffee shortage. People began to cut their coffee grounds with dried chicory root to stretch out their coffee stash. After the war ended, most folks went back to 100% coffee, but New Orleanians preferred the coffee and chicory blend and stuck with it. To this day, you will find coffee and chicory in many Louisiana households.